Tips

7 Tips to Grilling in Cold Weather Temps

7 Tips to Grilling in Cold Weather Temps

It’s been a cold winter this season in Colorado but that doesn’t mean you have to skip out on grilling outside. These seven simple tips will still produce the juiciest meats even if you have to wear a parka while doing it! 

Tip 1:

Cooking in an enclosed area or under a porch or overhang is never advisable but you can still move your grill closer to your home. If possible, reposition your grill where it is out of the cold gusts of winter. 

Tip 2:

If you have a propane grill, be sure to have an extra tank on hand. Colder temps mess with the amount of fuel needed to properly cook your meats when compared to those spring and summer temperatures. 

Tip 3:

Avoid using a plate or anything that is not covered when transporting your meats from the grill to the kitchen. Your best bet is using ceramic cookware that has a lid. 

Tip 4: 

Have your grill fired up and at optimal temps before bringing out your meat in that covered ceramic cookware. On average, you will need at least five extra minutes or even more to get the right temperature. 

Tip 5: 

If your grill takes longer to heat up your meats will have the same problem. Count on adding 20 minutes additional cooking time per pound if temps drop below 45 degrees F.  This especially applies to meats such as chicken. 

Tip 6:

Don’t waste any time getting your meats transported to the grill. Close that lid as fast as you can to keep the heat trapped and from temperatures quickly dropping. 

Tip 7: 

The thicker the cut of meat, the longer you will have to cook it. If you don’t want to use extra propane or worry that a roast, chicken or turkey won’t be ready in time, go with leaner or thinner cuts of meat such as pork chops

Make sure you bundle up while you’re out there and invest in a meat thermometer to get the optimal temperature for your cooked meats since you are working against frigid weather! 

How to Perfectly Cook Steak Indoors

How to Perfectly Cook Steak Indoors

It’s winter in Colorado and for grill lovers or grilled steak lovers standing in the snow is not the ideal experience especially if you are craving the juiciness of a prime rib or new york strip. 

But don’t let that hold you back from enjoying steak for dinner any winter night. Believe it or not, the best steaks are made perfectly seared in a pan. In fact, cooking steak on the stove allows the steak to cook evenly while creating a delectable crust and sealing those juices. If you’ve got a pan…we’ve got your plan. 

Here is how to cook steak indoors:

Pan-Seared Steak 

Ingredients:

1-2 lbs of your favorite cut of steak 

5 tbsp of vegetable or peanut oil (NOT olive oil..!)

4 tbsp butter (the real stuff…margarine will not cut it)

Prep:

Salt and pepper your meat and allow the meat to sit for at least an hour. Ideally, your steak should be at room temperature. Break out that pan and drop that vegetable or peanut oil in the bottom making sure to evenly coat it. Heat the stove on high and drop the meat. You don’t need too much time searing up that meat…maybe 5 minutes on each side making sure to flip it every 30 seconds. 

You will know you are doing it right if there is a nice golden crust on the outside of the steak. Remember that butter? Tilt that pan and spoon it over the steak. 

Remove steak from heat and allow to sit for at least five minutes and voila!….serve with a loaded baked potato, salad or asparagus. 

Tailgaiting Etiquette Tips Dos and Dont’s

Tailgaiting Etiquette Tips Dos and Dont’s

We are in the midst of football tailgating season and while chowing down on your favorite meats and sausages is strongly encouraged there are some tailgating rules you should be aware of. 

We’ve broken down a list of tailgating dos and don’ts. Don’t say you weren’t warned. 

Bring a camp chair and skip squatting on the lid of a cooler regardless of whether it can hold your weight. This is particularly annoying for anyone that is trying to crack a cold one. Plus, it puts the person just trying to enjoy a beer in a position to apologize for asking you to move your butt out of the way. 

Don’t show up empty-handed. Tailgaiting is a communal experience and showing up with two single beers for yourself or nothing at all is considered a slight. Especially if a decent bottle of booze is passed around. 

If you are grabbing a beer from that cooler be polite and ask if anyone else would want one as well. You know, sandbox rules. 

Bring some decent meats to grill and share and be careful not to bash someone else’s ribs or wings. This is not the time for a grill-off unless that was pre-planned. 

If you have food allergies don’t make a big deal out of it. Just pack up your pre-portioned meal or snacks and casually mention that you have an allergy to XYZ if offered any other foods. If you DON’T have an allergy and someone wants you to sample all the glory of their grilling skills accept a taste gracefully even if you don’t’ like peppers. 

Clean up after yourself and especially if you didn’t put in the hard work of grilling up those meats. That goes a long way to being invited back for more tailgating shenanigans. 

Be nice. Let’s say you were there cheering on the opposing team and they happen to be the visiting team…singing a rendition of Queen’s We Are the Champions is a big NO-NO. Be humble to your hosts. 

Stay with your crew. It’s cool to hop to different tailgates where you know other people but be sure and return to the crew that invited you. 

Safety first. It shouldn’t have to be said but practice safety. After all, you are dealing with Sterno cans and hot coals all mixed in with beer and other spirits. Here is a handy guide on tailgating safety tips

Last but not least….don’t forget the bottle opener! 

What is Spatchcocking and Why You Should Do it to Your Turkey This Thanksgiving

What is Spatchcocking and Why You Should Do it to Your Turkey This Thanksgiving

What the heck is spatchcock and what does it have to do with Thanksgiving? Turns out, quite a bit and you will want to do it this upcoming holiday season. Spatchcock or spatchcocking is a term that your local butcher or meat shop has known for some time.  Simply put, it’s a meat cutting technique used for splitting open a whole chicken, duck or turkey for grilling. 

One of the many benefits of spatchcocking your chosen fowl is less cooking time, crispy outer skin and a juicier bird. Not only that, it has that wow effect when presented at your Thanksgiving table. 

Here is a step-by-step on how to spatchcock your turkey: 

Step 1:  Before you even get started, be sure to spend the money on a decent pair of poultry shears. If you do decide to do it yourself you will want a solid cutting board. Place your bird breast side down. Begin by cutting both sides along the backbone. (Discard or better yet, keep the backbone for gravy-making purposes.) 

Step 2:  Flip the bird over and pull or fold it apart. If you have done it right, you will be able to snap the bone by pushing on it with your hands. 

Step 3:  Pull the thighs of the bird apart which will allow it to flatten out even more. Using those poultry shears, cut off the wingtips.

Step 4:  Put your recently-spatchcocked turkey into a baking tray. If you plan on prepping the night before, cover and refrigerate. However, if you are doing it the day of cooking it will need to sit at least 30 minutes before you cook it. Brush it with olive oil or butter and your favorite herbs. 

Step 5:  A typical turkey can take up to 90 minutes to cook but a good rule of thumb is to cook until the skin gets brown and crispy (which is the best part.) 

If this seems a bit too much work you can always reach out to your local meat and butcher shop to do it for you. Good luck and you can thank us later for this crowd-pleasing turkey!